A Going Concern.

20. male. UT Dallas. Boricua.
leftist politics, history, hip hop, etc.
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jackanthfern:

Literally the only thing I can say is OMG

(Source: xtjna)

boxlunches:

The Iron Throne as described in the novels, officially endorsed by GRRM on his blog as the most accurate artistic representation thus far. By artist Marc Simonetti.

Oh

(Source: jinx-effect)

applebvm:

being friends before becoming romantically involved is probably the one coolest things that could happen between people

anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage

A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.

Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.

It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:

This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).

Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.

Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.

The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

solarselection:

bigeisamazing:

finally

This shit about to be like Quaaludes now

(Source: bapestas)

malformalady:

A Chinese businessman hid two illegally built extra storeys on his penthouse suite with trees and plants. The penthouse already had a roofgarden, but it was increased in size to deceive neighbours and officials.

After several centuries of brutal anti-black racism and structural white privilege, apparently 50 years of meager civil rights progress was too unbearable for many “aggrieved” white people. Gutting the Voting Rights Act, weakening Affirmative Action and the proliferation of Stand Your Ground laws are each part of an unmistakable conservative effort to return all of America to a pre-civil rights, antebellum confederacy where “states rights,” judicial nullification and Jim Crow etiquette are the norm. Again.

(Source: odinsblog)

nobledrewali:

chipcococafe:

rectumofglory:

NOTHING IS BETTER THAN GOOD RICE LITERALLY NOTHING

NO RICE NO LIFE.

finally people understand me .

gov-info:

Smithsonian Mag Gov Doc: Not All Knights of the Round Table Were White

Picture the knights of the round table. They’re probably tall and strong, wearing armor and drinking out of chalices. And they’re probably all white. And while most of that picture is relatively accurate, the whiteness is not. Meet Sir Morien, the black knight of the round table. 

The blog MedievalPoC points out that Morien has been largely forgotten or white-washed in modern depictions of the round table. But early texts describe him pretty clearly as not-white. The blog quotes from the translated saga of Morien:

He was all black, even as I tell ye: his head, his body, and his hands were all black, saving only his teeth. His shield and his armour were even those of a Moor, and black as a raven…

Had they not heard him call upon God no man had dared face him, deeming that he was the devil or one of his fellows out of hell, for that his steed was so great, and he was taller even than Sir Lancelot, and black withal, as I said afore…

When the Moor heard these words he laughed with heart and mouth (his teeth were white as chalk, otherwise was he altogether black)…

Morien isn’t even the only knight who isn’t white in the Arthurian folklore as the blog Elodie Under Glass points out:

First off, six percent of the Knights of the Round Table were men of color. Granted, that’s only three out of 49 men, but the entire expanded United States Congress is hovering around 13% people of color and only has one black Senator. 

Although, it’s worth noting, one of those three men is green. But he’s definitely not white. So why do all our modern renditions of the round table include a team of totally white guys? Well, not every version of the round table stories points out specifically that Morien is black. Elodie Under Glass explains:

Meanwhile, characters in these stories aren’t really visually described unless they have superlative characteristics, such as mysterious all-black armor or remarkably long golden hair. Many knights were described as dark in hair and features. Instead of placing a large flashing sign in the middle of a saga going “THIS PERSON IS TOTALLY A PERSON OF COLOR YOU GUYS, WE REALLY HOPE YOU WILL TAKE THIS INTO ACCOUNT IN FUTURE ADAPTATIONS” the narrative might well have said “Sir Bors, who was dark” and moved on, assuming that readers or listeners would interpret it the way the narrator meant.

So the storytellers assumed we’d be sharp enough to pick up on their hints that Morien was black. Turns out, we’re not. And the West prefers white heroes anyway. So we now get a round table of white men.

Images via MedievalPoC: Miniature from Illuminated Manuscript circa 1350s; Statue of a Knight believed to be representative of Morien c. 1220

The short guide to Capital in the 21st Century 

Can you give me Piketty’s argument in four bullet points?

  • The ratio of wealth to income is rising in all developed countries.
  • Absent extraordinary interventions, we should expect that trend to continue.
  • If it continues, the future will look like the 19th century, where economic elites have predominantly inherited their wealth rather than working for it.
  • The best solution would be a globally coordinated effort to tax wealth.
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